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You are transitioning to contemporary jobs and business-driven IT. You need a genuine security solution built around the four essential verbs of SaaS security: find, prioritize, protect, and orchestrate. It seems sense to assume that a cloud access security broker is the ideal place to start (CASB).

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Here are 4 reasons why the CASB playbook always fails.

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1. Discoveries. Not User-SaaS connections, but logs and events are what CASB finds.

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Events produced by users as they go through the CASB infrastructure are what drive the CASB playbook. An event or record shows a user-SaaS connection if a user is accessing a prospective SaaS application after passing via CASB proxies.

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2. Setting priorities. CASB puts its knowledge first and disregards anything else.

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The CASB playbook is limited to what it can route through its infrastructure dependencies, much like with discovery. This design weakness gives CASB the predisposition to seek out and destroy, using more of the infrastructure it relies on to curb, prevent, halt, or restrict the limited SaaS it perceives. 

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3. Reliable. CASB safeguards routes rather than individuals.

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CASB protects against predictable events using controlled devices, clouds, applications, and user-agents. Modern work's assault and changes in how people (rather than gadgets) access SaaS apps changed the rules of the game. Analyst reports and academic theory may depict the idealized world of CASB security, but in actual use, practically all CASB deployments have significant flaws.

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4. Coordinate. SaaS lifecycle security is not delivered by CASB.

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There must be a beginning and an end for anything moving through a lifecycle—the womb and the cemetery. In the secure SaaS lifecycle, these two process endings are the exact times when CASB falls short of expectations.